About

I am a 32 year old kiwi girl who has hip pain. It started with an accident at the gym over 2 years ago. I’ve had surgery to clean up a torn ligament and some torn cartalidge. The surgery was semi-successful as I am better than I was pre-op however I am now suffering from chronic hip pain which is having quite an impact on my life. I used to be very active and I feel like this hip pain is holding me back. Its painful, frustrating and tiring. I’ve been told I have mild Cam/Pincer FAI + mild dysplasia, but the pain I am in is most likely to be caused by the initial injury and surgery.

Chronic pain can be very isolating and I can tell my friends and family are a little bored of hearing about the hip pain. This blog is just a space for me to process what I am going through and share my experiences with others who may be in a similar situation.

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Published by

julia

I am a kiwi who likes to live and travel overseas.

5 thoughts on “About”

  1. I know how you feel, stay strong and try not to let what others think bother you, easier said than done I know and I too, struggle with this.

    Best wishes to you.

  2. Really sorry to hear these comments from patients. We doctors should be more on the level of the patients to listen to those stories. I alway try and am quite sucessful I must say but there are too many people who do not receive the right answer to their problems. In two words: the “light surgery” for the mentioned “FAI” ist often not adequate. To really cure the hip dysplasia, one should correct the malposition of the joint by osteotomy.

    1. If I may ask Dr. Klaue… your comment has come to me at a time I am exploring the exact scenario you describe. I had FAI surgery which failed 2 years ago – and now am being told I am unstable (dysplastic) — My False Profile View measures VI angle of 10 degrees. CE angles normal. Do you think Periacetabular Osteotomy is the best solution, even for a patient who is 48 and has good joint space but cartilage damage? Where does THR fit into this equation of correcting the instability? REalize you posted in June — and sorry to Julia for hijacking her blog … but this is a decision I am facing as I write – so thought perhaps a “sign”. Thank you most kindly ~ Robyn Lee

  3. Thank you both for your comments.

    Klaue, it is so good to see that there are doctors out there who go the extra mile to listen to patients stories. The fact that you are reading this blog gives me confidence that there are some fantastic doctors/surgeons out there. 🙂

    Chris, I wish you the best of luck with your own battle with learning to live with chronic pain. It really does mess with our lives big time… emotionally, physically and spiritually. Stay strong and keep smiling.

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